3301 Waverly Drive

3301 Waverly Drive was the home of Leno and Rosemary LaBianca. On August 10, 1969, grocer Leno LaBianca and his wife Rosemary were murdered in their home by members of the Manson Family.

In 1940, Leno’s father Antonio Labianca bought the house on Waverly Drive. In 1951 Leno’s father passed away. In 1968, Leno bought the Waverly Drive house from his mother.

In the summer of 1969 there was a number of break-ins at the Waverly Drive house. Leno and Rosemary desperately wanted to move out of the Waverly Drive house. They never got the chance.

Manson’s Waverly Drive Backstory

1966. While incarcerated at Terminal Island Prison Charles Manson met flamboyant producer Phil Kaufman. After Kaufman’s release from prison he hooked up with Manson. Kaufman spent most of his time crashing at the house of his friend, Harold True.

Manson regularly visited Kaufman there, Manson even stayed a week at Harold’s house. Harold lived at 3267 Waverly Drive. The next door neighbors at 3301 Waverly Drive were Leno and Rosemary LaBianca.

Motive: The LaBianca’s weren’t Manson’s first choice

As for the motive, the LaBianca’s were not Manson’s target. Manson first went to the residence of Harold True. Harold wasn’t at home so Manson went over to the LaBianca’s.

At the murder trial Linda Kasabian testified that after she parked the car in front of the LaBianca house she asked Manson, “Charlie, you’re not going into that house (Labianca’s), are you?”

Manson replied, ‘No, I’m going next door.’ (Harold True’s house)

“He got out of the car. He disappeared up the walkway, the driveway, leading towards Harold’s house, and I couldn’t follow him any longer, he just disappeared.”

Manson agreed to this version of events in 1998:

“And I went to see Harold. Harold wasn’t there, and I looked over and I seen a light over on the other side, and I walked over there and there was a little dog there. So I patted the dog on the head and I opened the door and there was a dude (Leno LaBianca) sitting on the couch. “And when I walked in, I said, ‘Oh, hey. Hi.’

After the Murders

After the murders a Filipino couple bought the Waverly Drive house. The address has been changed from 3301 to 3311 Waverly Drive. The house was back on the market in 1998 and sold for $375,000.

Advertisements

28 Clubhouse Avenue

Mark Ross aka Aesop Aquarian (born 2/27/1945) was a Manson Family associate. In the late 60’s Mark lived in a beach house located at 28 Clubhouse Avenue, Venice, CA. On several occasions various Manson Family members stayed at his Venice Beach house.

On Wednesday November 5th, 1969 the Venice Police Department responded to a call at 28 Clubhouse Avenue. At the scene police discovered the body of Manson associate John Haught. Haught was lying on a mattress in the bedroom. He had an entrance wound to the right temple. There was a leather gun case and a revolver lying beside the body.

According to Madaline Joan Cottage, she and Haught were in bed, when he picked up a .22 Caliber revolver. After Madaline told Haught that there was only one bullet in the gun, he spun the cylinder, placed the muzzle against his head, and shot himself.

Several Manson Family members were present when Haught died, including Bruce Davis, Madaline Joan Cottage, Sue Bartell and Catherine Gillies. They told the police that Haught killed himself playing Russian roulette. The police ruled Haught’s death a suicide, however there are indications that Haught may have been murdered. No fingerprints were found on the gun, not even Haught’s own prints, the gun was wiped clean.

An anonymous source told the L.A Times that he was there when Haught died. He claimed Haught didn’t kill himself but was shot by one of the Manson girls.

Myers Ranch

Myers Ranch was built in 1932 by Bill and Barbara Myers, Catherine Gillies’ grandparents. The Myers lived on the ranch until 1960 when they relocated to Fresno so that their children could have a better education.

The ranch was built of wood ties from the Searles Lake monorail. The Myers ran a gas and food stop called Wild rose Station.

In 1968, Charles Manson learned about the isolated Myers Ranch from Gillies. Agreeing that the ranch would likely meet their needs, the Manson Family began a move to the ranch. The buildings at Barker Ranch being in better condition, the Family ended up at Barker Ranch, approximately half a mile down the road from Myers Ranch. At times, the Family members were using both Barker and Myers ranch.

Myers Ranch burned down in 1999. The property has been completely reconstructed. Today it remains a private, occupied residence, unavailable for public visitation.

Dennis Wilson’s House

Location: 14400 Sunset Boulevard, Pacific Palisades, California

14400 Sunset Boulevard was Dennis Wilson’s home in the late 1960s. Described as a large log-cabin-style home, Wilson hosted the Manson Family here for a summer to great expense.

Formerly the hunting lodge of Will Rogers, the three-acred estate at 14400 Sunset Boulevard was surrounded with manicure lawns and a swimming pool in the shape of the state of California.

In 1968 Dennis Wilson picked up two hitchhikers, Patricia Krenwinkel and Ella Jo Bailey and took them to his home at 14400 Sunset Boulevard. Dennis later went to a recording session. When he returned around 3 a.m. he was met in his driveway by Charles Manson. Wilson asked “are you going to hurt me?” Manson replied, “Do I look like I’m going to hurt you, brother?” Manson then dropped to his knees and kissed Wilsons’s feet.

Dennis became fascinated by Manson and his followers. The Manson Family lived with Dennis for a period of time. The Manson girls cleaned the house, shopped and cooked. At night they provided Wilson with sexual entertainment but Wilson soon put a stop to this. A lot of the Manson girls had a number of venereal diseases and Wilson took all the girls to his doctor for penicillin shots. Susan Atkins teeth needed to be fixed and Wilson paid the dentist bill.

The Family ended up costing Dennis up to $100,000, today that would be around $700,000, in money, cars, clothes, food and penicillin shots. When Wilson finally had enough of Manson’s freeloading Wilson simply moved out of his own house.

After the murders in the summer of 1969, Wilson commented, “I’m the luckiest guy in the world, because i got off only losing my money.”

Beach Boy Mike Love:

“Dennis lived in a luxurious house, on three acres, with a swimming pool and plenty of guest rooms. Guileless about others, indifferent about his own possessions, Dennis was all too happy to allow Manson and his girls to move in, use his charge cards, take his clothes, eat his food, and even drive his Mercedes. Beyond what was spent on his credit card, Dennis paid the medical costs for the women who were treated for sexually transmitted diseases. His house was ransacked. Furniture, clothes, guitars, stereo equipment, and gold records – they took most everything of Dennis’s that wasn’t nailed down. They also totaled his Mercedes and crashed his ferrari. By summer’s end, Dennis figured he had lost about $100,000 to his roommates.”

Further reading: A Beach Boy 17 Girls and Charles Manson

The Yellow Submarine

Location: 21019 Gresham St, Canoga Park, California

In need of a place to rehearse music, Manson rented a house in Canoga Park. The building earned its nickname the “Yellow Submarine” because of it’s yellow paint.

The one-story ranch-style house sat on about an acre of ground, had four bedrooms, two baths, a big kitchen and a large front room that made a great studio for music sessions. It was only about a thirty-minute drive from Hollywood, and only a few miles from Spahn’s Ranch.

Within a couple of weeks after the Family moved in the house had become a dope pad and a place to dismantle stolen cars. It wasn’t long before the acre at the house became too small. The Family was growing in numbers and stolen car parts started piling up and attracted the attention of the police. Eventually the Family moved back to Spahn Ranch. The Yellow Submarine was demolished in the early 70’s.

From Manson in his own words:

Of course, we still had people at Spahn, mostly girls who spelled each other looking after George. But things at Spahn were too disorganized for us to do any serious rehearsing. Finding a place that would accommodate fifteen or twenty kids wasn’t an easy task. I finally found a house on Gresham Street in Canoga Park.

Spahn’s Movie Ranch

Spahn Ranch, built in 1920, also known as Spahn’s Movie Ranch, was a ranch used for filming Western movies and TV-shows. Episodes for Bonanza, The Lone Ranger, and Zorro were filmed at Spahn’s Ranch.

Spahn Movie Ranch was the home of the Manson Family during the Tate/LaBianca murders. In late 1969, Robert Hendrickson filmed the Manson Family at Spahn Ranch for his Oscar nominated documentary Manson.

By 1968, when Manson arrived at the ranch, George Spahn was 80 years old and nearly blind. Spahn allowed out-of-work stuntmen and ranch hands to live on the property in return for labor. Manson and his followers fit right in and did chores and helped run the horse-rental business, George Spahn primarily made money by renting horse rides through the property.

But at the ranch several ranch hands disapproved of the new tenants, repeatedly warning Spahn about Manson. A ranch hand named Donald “Shorty” Shea, would eventually be killed by members of the family.

Raid

On August 16, 1969, around 6:00 am, the Los Angeles County Sheriffs Department raided Spahn Ranch. They were looking for stolen cars not knowing they had the Tate/LaBianca killers in reach. The sheriff’s report states they found Manson hiding beneath the building marked “Saloon”. Manson was laying face down in the dirt between the foundation timbers. As he crawled out and stood up a stolen credit card fell out of his pocket. Manson and most of the family members were arrested and booked at the Malibu police station.

Police also seized and impounded vehicles at the property, mostly VW dune buggies, a couple of motorcycles and, most importantly, a 1959 Ford (registration plate GYY 435). The Ford had provided transportation for the Tate and La Bianca murders.

Wildfire

In September, 1970, a wildfire destroyed all of Spahn Movie Ranch’s sets and structures. After the fire, George Spahn moved back to North Hollywood, to live with the wife he had left years before. Today the site is part of California’s Santa Susana Pass State Historic Park.

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood

Quentin Tarantino recreated Spahn Ranch [Video] for the upcoming movie Once Upon A Time In Hollywood. Burt Reynolds was originally cast as George Spahn, but he passed away weeks before he was scheduled to shoot his scenes. The film was originally scheduled to be released on August 9, 2019, the 50th anniversary of the Tate murders, before Sony changed the release date to July 26, 2019.

Spahn Ranch Image Gallery

The Barker ranch

The Barker Ranch is located inside Death Valley National Park in eastern California. Used as a mining and recreational property from the 1940s to the 1960s, it is infamous due to its association with Manson and his Family.

The Barker Ranch was built in the 1930’s by Butch and Helen Thomason. Looking for Gold they left the city to mine in the Panamint Range. Often times homesteaders during the early 20th century would move to the desert for the dry air, solitude, and pleasant winter weather.

Sometime during the 1950’s the Thomason’s sold the ranch to Arlene Barker who moved to California from Oklahoma. The Barkers added additional structures to the ranch property. This included a concrete swimming pool, fences, and an array of other comforts.

In 1968, Charles Manson learned about the isolated Myers Ranch from Gillies. Agreeing that the ranch would likely meet their needs, the Manson Family began a move to the ranch. The buildings at Barker Ranch being in better condition, the Family ended up at Barker Ranch, approximately half a mile down the road from Myers Ranch.

The Inyo County sheriff department, captured the Manson Family in raids on October 10 and October 12, 1969. Manson was caught hiding under the bathroom sink. At the time of the arrest the cops were unaware of the magnitude of their find. They wanted to arrest the persons responsible for vandalism within Death Valley National Monument further north, unaware that they had arrested the persons responsible for the Tate/Labianca murders.

Due to a fire in May 2009, most of the main structure has been destroyed with only the concrete and rock portion of the cabin still standing. Today the remnants of the ranch belong to National Park Service.