Charles Manson

Charles Manson led a commune that became known as the Manson Family. Manson and his followers committed a series of nine murders at four locations over a period of five weeks in the summer of 1969.

Manson was admitted to state prison from Los Angeles County on April 22, 1971, for seven counts of first-degree murder and one count of conspiracy to commit murder for the deaths of Abigail Ann Folger, Wojciech Frykowski, Steven Earl Parent, Sharon Tate Polanski, Jay Sebring and Leno and Rosemary LaBianca.

On December 13, 1971, Manson was convicted of first-degree murder in Los Angeles County Court for the July 25, 1969 death of musician Gary Hinman. He was also convicted of first-degree murder for the August 1969 death of Donald Jerome “Shorty” Shea.

He was sentenced to death. When the death penalty was ruled unconstitutional in 1972, he was resentenced to life with the possibility of parole. His original death sentence was modified to life on February 2, 1977.

Death

On January 1, 2017, Manson was suffering from gastrointestinal bleeding. He was rushed to Mercy Hospital in downtown Bakersfield. A source told the Los Angeles Times that Manson was seriously ill and that the doctors considered him “too weak” for surgery. On November 15, 2017, Manson returned to a hospital in Bakersfield. He died from cardiac arrest resulting from respiratory failure and colon cancer at the hospital four days later on November 19.

Funeral

Nearly four months after Manson’s death, his remains were cremated following a private funeral that featured songs by the Beach Boys and Guns ‘N Roses.

Mark Pitcher, pastor of the Church of the Nazarene who presided over the service, told the Associated Press that 20 to 25 of Manson’s friends and family members attended the service, held at a funeral and cremation center in Porterville, California. Manson’s ashes were later scattered in a nearby creek bed.